Greek submarine volcano near Santorini Island rattled by 3.2 magnitude earthquake

December 14, 2011GREECEAt 19h22 GMT (21h22 local time), a 3.2 earthquake occurred at the little-known submarine volcano Kolumbos ca. 8 km NE of Santorini, Island, Greece. This marks one of the largest events in recent months. The submarine volcano whose peak rises to just 18 m below sea level, is located on the tectonically active SW-NE fault system across Santorini which confines most volcanic vents of the Santorini volcanic complex in the past 500,000 years. Kolumbus volcano last erupted in September 1650 following a year of frequent earthquakes. The eruption produced a large explosive pumice eruption, with ash fall recorded as far as Turkey, and built a temporary island. The main phase of the eruption triggered a devastating tsunami. Toxic gasses killed more than 25 people and hundreds of livestock on Santorini by suffocation (probably H2S). There is no reason to state that new activity from Santorini or Kolumbus is likely in a foreseeable future but on the other hand, there are very few data available, unfortunately, to judge the situation. We regret that the Greek monitoring institutes are not publishing more details about the ongoing activity. Access to important earthquake details such as as their depth, are not published (they are available for earthquakes in all the other regions in Greece, raising some suspect why not for Santorini…) –Volcano Discovery
This entry was posted in Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Earthquake Omens?, High-risk potential hazard zone, Potential Earthchange hotspot, Seismic tremors, Volcano Watch. Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to Greek submarine volcano near Santorini Island rattled by 3.2 magnitude earthquake

  1. If depth is not published, could be to protect tourism. I believe tourism is the main industry of Santorini. I was there on a ship with my husband and son. My husband and I did not want to take the animal-harming mule ride up to the town from the harbor (the harbor is the site of the big caldera), and our son went alone on the mule ride.

    Like

    • Hi,
      You can find all the details on the seismic activity online on the site of the Aristotel University of Thessaloniki http://geophysics.geo.auth.gr/ss/station_index_en.html That is the main university that follows up the activity of the volcano with their own instruments in Santorini. As a Santorinian myself, I tell you that manny times we hear rumours about the volcano erupting etc. One thing is for sure, if anything goes wrong, I honestly do not beleive that the Greek state will be able to offer us ANYTHING unfortunately!

      Like

  2. Elizabeth says:

    That’s interesting that Greece is not releasing data for this one area, given how dangerous an eruption could be there. Alvin, in your studies, have you come across any reason they would intentionally keep this quiet, or is it just a case of not being as diligent as they are in the monitering of other seismic areas of Greece? I can’t think of a reason they would want to keep a potentially dangerous siesmic ‘awakening’ from the public, but these days there is so much deception from governments about the (quite obvious) Earth changes, so nothing really surprises me anymore.

    Like

    • Greece has a lot of seismic monitoring stations as the country is riddled with very dangerous volcanic cavitities and faults. I can’t imagine the information not being available to someone.

      Like

      • Elizabeth says:

        Maybe the people writing this article have missed it or something. It’s weird that they said it wasn’t published. Do you have a link to Greek seismic monitering sites? I would like to check for myself and see if it’s posted. If you don’t, i’ll try looking it up.

        Like

  3. Erica Gregory says:

    what they hiding ???????????//

    Like

  4. olivia says:

    Santorini ‘s volcanic activity is considered to be by many archaeologist the root of the sudden total collapse/destruction of the Mycenean and Minoan civilisation, circa 1600BC. A monster volcano indeed

    Like

  5. bscholzeoha says:

    OK, you can find some of the last data here: http://bit.ly/ug1Imr

    It’s quite a difficult way to publish data about volcanic tremor under Santorini Volcano, because everybody is thinking of the great volcanic eruption at the end of the Minoan culture. It is an interesting development that happens there. But you should still be careful to avoid unnecessary panic.

    Like

    • Elizabeth says:

      Thanks for the link!
      What you said about avoiding unnecessary panic is true for many situations these days. The government just loves to toss in a terror plot every month to keep people on their toes, and the ‘science’ channels on TV, including History Channel, really pimp their doomsday scenarios. The fact is we could get taken out at any time, so there is no point in panicking; being prepared is always good, but living in fear is counter-productive.

      Like

  6. olivia says:

    We have no intentions to create any panic on this blog. It is just good to learn / brush up with some historic facts. Facts are facts , that ‘s all.

    Like

    • Elizabeth says:

      Personally, I don’t get panicked, things are going to happen and most we can’t prevent; it’s the price we pay for living on this beautiful planet. I agree it is good to learn, as someone who is physically and severly disabled, I spend my time exercising my brain. I literally spend hours a day just learning about any topic I can feast my eyes and ears on, and I don’t let myself get scared. Actually, I find that the more I learn about what is going on in the world (whether it’s politics, economics, social issues, or earth changes) the more prepared I feel to meet a challenge or disaster. I take the proverb ‘Knowledge Is Power’ to heart. I have made some pretty major changes in my life in the last 5 years because of information I have learned about the challenges facing our civilization, and it has made my life not only better now, but prepared me for coming problems.

      There will always be people who freak out at the slightest mention of disaster, but for those of us who enjoy learning and who like to be prepared for any problems, the information posted on this site is invaluable. Olivia, do you work with Alvin on Exctintion Protocol, or were you referring to Volcano Discovery blog? Which ever one you are a part of, I want to thank you, as I would rather be informed about interesting subjects whether or not they are potential problems rather than stay ignorant anyday. I also am just obsessed with history, science, politics, social issues, and religion; I come to this site probably half a dozen times or more everyday to check for new posts, as well as many other sites. I guess it has a lot to do with having endless time on my hands. I can do a couple of hours a day of light activity, usually a bit of light housework (I thank the Divine for a husband who is willing to do the heavier stuff after work, and never complains about it) and then some artwork, but mostly I spend my time learning things and keeping up with current events. I think I would go crazy if I spent all my time on mindless reality TV and mainstream media (although it’s good to moniter it to see what they are feeding the sheeple). People like you and Alvin, who spend your time finding and collecting vast information and reliable news for us to read, are wonderful people and a boon to humanity.

      Blessings…

      Like

    • Elizabeth says:

      Sorry, forgot to add something.

      Now, saying I don’t panic is not to say that there are not things that make my blood run cold. One thing I fear above all else is our government, and the actions it has taken, and is continuing to take, to shut down our society. The people of Germany didn’t ever think it could happen to them, until it did. I am very concerned about our future here in the US, and in many places around the world. I have no doubt we are spiralling toward a third world war, and I just pray it is stopped, but fate will have her way with us.

      Like

  7. Baynne says:

    I am of like mind to some other comments… Santorini is a hot spot for tourists, the last thing a country on the brink of collapse wants is a disruption in tourism (a main contributor to revenue for Greece). So although there maybe some activity, I am sure they would be quick to alert the appropriate organisations and people to ensure the safety for the people and visitors of Santorini.
    Otherwise there is no reason to hide such activity…. Or so I imagine (will look out to see what others write here).

    Like

All comments are moderated. We reserve the right not to post any comment deemed defamatory, inappropriate, or spam.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s