Snow, gale-force winds, hurricane remnants, full moon (high tides): forecasters warn of ‘perfect storm’ scenario

October 25, 2012 NEW YORK - Much of the U.S. East Coast has a good chance of getting blasted by gale-force winds, flooding, heavy rain and maybe even snow early next week by an unusual hybrid of hurricane and winter storm, federal and private forecasters say. Though still projecting several days ahead of Halloween week, the computer models are spooking meteorologists. Government scientists said Wednesday the storm has a 70 percent chance of smacking the Northeast and mid-Atlantic. Hurricane Sandy in the Caribbean, an early winter storm in the West, and a blast of arctic air from the North are predicted to collide, sloshing and parking over the country’s most populous coastal corridor starting Sunday. The worst of it should peak early Tuesday, but it will stretch into midweek, forecasters say. “It’ll be a rough couple days from Hatteras up to Cape Cod,” said forecaster Jim Cisco of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration prediction center in College Park, Md. “We don’t have many modern precedents for what the models are suggesting.” It is likely to hit during a full moon when tides are near their highest, increasing coastal flooding potential, NOAA forecasts warn. And with some trees still leafy and the potential for snow, power outages could last to Election Day, some meteorologists fear. They say it has all the earmarks of a billion-dollar storm. Some have compared it to the so-called Perfect Storm that struck off the coast of New England in 1991, but Cisco said that one didn’t hit as populated an area and is not comparable to what the East Coast may be facing. Nor is it like last year’s Halloween storm, which was merely an early snowstorm in the Northeast. This has much more mess potential because it is a combination of different storm types that could produce a real whopper of weather problems, meteorologists say. “The Perfect Storm only did $200 million of damage and I’m thinking a billion,” said Jeff Masters, meteorology director of the private service Weather Underground. “Yeah, it will be worse.” But this is several days in advance, when weather forecasts are far less accurate. The National Hurricane Center only predicts five days in advance, and on Wednesday their forecasts had what’s left of Sandy off the North Carolina coast on Monday. But the hurricane center’s chief hurricane specialist, James Franklin, said the threat keeps increasing for “a major impact in the Northeast, New York area. In fact it would be such a big storm that it would affect all of the Northeast.” The forecasts keep getting gloomier and more convincing with every day, several experts said. Cisco said the chance of the storm smacking the East jumped from 60 percent to 70 percent on Wednesday. Masters was somewhat skeptical on Tuesday, giving the storm scenario just a 40 percent likelihood, but on Wednesday he also upped that to 70 percent. The remaining computer models that previously hadn’t shown the merger and mega-storm formation now predict a similar scenario. The biggest question mark is snow, and that depends on where the remnants of Sandy turn inland. The computer model that has been leading the pack in predicting the hybrid storm has it hitting around Delaware. But another model has the storm hitting closer to Maine. If it hits Delaware, the chances of snow increase in that region. If it hits farther north, chances for snow in the mid-Atlantic and even up to New York are lessened, Masters said. –Time
About these ads
This entry was posted in Civilizations unraveling, Climate unraveling, Cloudburst storms with flashflooding, Cyclone or Hurricane, Deluge from torrential rains, Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Extreme Weather Event, Gale-force winds and gusts, Prophecies referenced, Rare snowfall, Signs of Magnetic Field weakening, Strange high tides & freak waves, Time - Event Acceleration. Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to Snow, gale-force winds, hurricane remnants, full moon (high tides): forecasters warn of ‘perfect storm’ scenario

  1. nickk0 says:

    Just what we need. :|

    Like

  2. Kerry says:

    Sounds like my family is gonna have to say sorry for teasing me for my prepper tendencies… Glad I’m stocked up here in the sticks.. stay safe everyone

    Like

  3. Get the cameras ready (water/snow-proof cameras, that is)

    Like

  4. Pete S. says:

    I think its pretty amazing that we can predict storms this far in advance, especially the severity and location.

    Like

  5. barb says:

    Treemageddon: Part Deux ?? If so, a lot of folks around my neighborhood (central CT) have been cutting trees down for the past year. I’d say we’re ready to face the storm now. (sam’s club will still probably run out of “D” batteries though!) I’m still not going to get a generator — ear muffs maybe — every other house on my street got one last year. They are SO loud and unnecessary, imho. …. better check my CO detectors

    Like

  6. Dave says:

    Well, we have PLENTY of warning…so let’s be prepared!!

    Like

  7. latinmolina says:

    WOW!! Well I am ready for whatever is coming my way…last year we all got hit hard here in Duchess.
    I got my generator and all my backup items to hold me out through this storm…

    Like

  8. Tennessee Jim says:

    That is not good at all. We have been having snow all week here in Montana. It is still not enough moisture to break this drought though.

    Like

  9. Gail says:

    Piers Corbyn says it ain’t so. He claims that this storm will miss the USA by veering off towards the east. We shall see….

    Like

  10. elizabeth says:

    I laughed when I read this in official HPC forecast discussion from the national weather service, and then I realized it was the same forecaster – JIm Cisco – that was quoted in the article posted here. Discussions are usually no nonsense and generally technical.

    A HYBRID VORTEX OVER THE MID ATLANTIC AND NORTHEAST NEXT TUESDAY.
    THE HIGH DEGREE OF BLOCKING FROM EASTERN NORTH AMERICA ACROSS THE
    ENTIRE ATLANTIC BASIN IS EXPECTED TO ALLOW THIS UNUSUAL MERGER TO
    TAKE PLACE, AND ONCE THE COMBINED GYRE MATERIALIZES, IT SHOULD
    SETTLE BACK TOWARD THE INTERIOR NORTHEAST THROUGH HALLOWEEN,
    INVITING PERHAPS A GHOULISH NICKNAME FOR THE CYCLONE ALONG THE
    LINES OF “FRANKENSTORM”, AN ALLUSION TO MARY SHELLEY’S GOTHIC
    CREATURE OF SYNTHESIZED ELEMENTS.

    full discussion at this link.

    http://www.hpc.ncep.noaa.gov/discussions/hpcdiscussions.php?disc=pmdepd&version=0&fmt=reg

    Seriously unusual storm conditions. My hat is off to Cisco, trying to get people to take notice without scaring them off. (kinda like you do here Alvin, good work)

    Like

  11. God keeps trying to get our attention, but how many people are really listening. It’s going to be a long winter, folks…

    Like

    • Irene C says:

      I agree davidgreybeard. Praying for everyone in the path of this storm. They’re saying that some of this might reach Ohio. I’ve been watching and I’m listening.

      Like

      • Me, too, Irene. The timing of this relative to the election makes it significant as well. Hopefully this won’t be as big of a problem as they think, but we are getting further and further into the time when huge events like this will be more common.

        Like

      • Irene C says:

        I’m hoping so too, but the more I’m watching this storm, the more I’m thinking it will be a big problem. A good part of Ohio is now in a possible power-outage area now. And a good part of the East Coast is in evacuation mode. The timing of this storm and the election hasn’t escaped my attention. I keep reminding myself that God is still on the throne.

        Like

All comments are moderated. We reserve the right not to post any comment deemed defamatory, inappropriate, or spam.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s