Waterworld: Region hit by third typhoon in a week: half of Manila swamped by floods as high as 3 meters

August 7, 2012PHILIPPINESShanghai and the nearby coastal province Zhejiang have evacuated 456,000 people as China prepares for its third typhoon in less than a week. The emergency measures were taken after Typhoon Haikui turned Manila, the Philippines capital into “Waterworld,” killing 50 people. The typhoon is expected to make landfall in Zhejiang province, just south of Shanghai, late Tuesday or early Wednesday, the China Meteorological Administration said. Shanghai officials fear the storm could be the worst since 2005, when Typhoon Matsa killed seven people in the city, state media said. The city aimed to move 200,000 people to more than a hundred shelters by Tuesday evening; government officials were quoted as saying. The Shanghai government ordered outdoor construction sites shut down and cancelled summer classes for children until the typhoon had eased. Authorities in Zhejiang were also rushing to get people out the path of the storm, with 256,000 residents of the province evacuated so far, state media said. More than 30,000 ships had rushed to shelter in ports. The typhoon was packing winds of up to 151 kilometres per hour and could bring up to 400 millimetres (16 inches) of rain to some areas, it said. The eastern provinces of Jiangsu and Anhui would also be affected. China is still recovering from Typhoons Damrey and Saola, which hit over the weekend. Those storms brought heavy rains that killed 23 and left nine missing. Xinhua said the heavy rains that came with the typhoons triggered mudslides and flooding, affecting hundreds of thousands of people. Typhoon Haikui’s torrential rains submerged much of the Philippine capital and surrounding areas on Tuesday, forcing nearly 270,000 people to flee their homes with more flooding expected in the north of the country as a tropical storm passes through the region, officials said. Steady rains for the past 10 days, killing more than 50 people, are set to continue until Wednesday, the Philippines weather bureau said. “It’s like Waterworld,” said Benito Ramos, head of the Philippines national disaster agency, referring to a Hollywood movie about a flooded world. Schools , financial markets, and public and private offices were ordered shut, including outsourcing firms whose corporate clients are mainly from the United States and Europe. Disaster officials said over half of Manila was swamped by floods as high as three metres, worsened by a high tide and the release of water from dams in surrounding provinces. President Benigno Aquino, in an emergency meeting briefly interrupted by a power failure at the main army base in Manila, ordered officials to exert maximum effort to aid residents in flooded areas. Officials have deployed army troops, police and emergency workers with rubber boats and amphibious trucks. –Telegraph
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This entry was posted in 2012, Civilizations unraveling, Climate unraveling, Cloudburst storms with flashflooding, Cyclone or Hurricane, Dark Ages, Deluge from torrential rains, Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Electric power disruption & grid failure, Extreme Weather Event, High-risk potential hazard zone, Human behavioral change after disaster, Signs of Magnetic Field weakening, Time - Event Acceleration, Unprecedented Flooding. Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Waterworld: Region hit by third typhoon in a week: half of Manila swamped by floods as high as 3 meters

  1. Garth Colin Whelan says:

    The Marikina river has swollen by 20 meters; that is 6 storeys high. The dam which supplies Manila’s water is overflowing also…..

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    • Unprecedented weather events —– Please take care. I do not how much you’re impacted but I’m glad you still have power if you are.

      A.

      Like

      • Brandon says:

        Alvin,
        You mentioned unprecedented weather events. I agree! But I was wondering though. How do we know everything happening to the planet is in fact unprecedented and worsening? Do we have data that goes back several hundred years ago? What if all we’re seeing now happened then? Just a thought is all. God bless!
        B.

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      • There has never been 7 billion people on the planet so, yes; it’s unprecendented because extreme weather and natural disaster events can take the lives of millions of people in the space of less than an hour. Up to now, only war or disease could do this…

        God bless

        Like

    • jehjeh007 says:

      I just finished a prayer for you Garth Colin Whelan, for you, your family and all the people you have touched throughout your life. Let us know when you are in a safe place. Peace, and faith to you.

      Like

  2. SoSoSon says:

    Take care most of all, prayers are with you all.

    Like

  3. James says:

    I really hate to hear that. I know I am very blessed. I live in a place that does not have a lot of randomized violent crimes. People are over all friendly. God has blessed me in so many ways it is unbelievable. He even gave me squash! That is something I have to give credit to God for. I even wrote a post and shared the sign he gave me and my family. The only hope we have in this world is for the people to repent. God have mercy on our souls.

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    • Tom says:

      Word. Praise the lord, im born and raised on a place with no spectacular events and fully normal weather.
      That might change though, if theres a new iceage for ex we have to move
      Many cities in the world is built on the wrong place and that will be obvius in coming years

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  4. My heart and prayers go out to all.

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  5. jaypee says:

    it’s not usual…there’s no storm signal…just monsoon..yet so devastating..our planet is changing dramatically this year only..

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  6. james says:

    Last week there were 2 storms at the same time in the North West Pacific basin, Typhoon SOALA and Typhoon DAMREY. Both storms hit the east coast of China almost simultaneously.

    This week there are AGAIN 2 storms at the same time (Typhoon HAIKUI and Typhoon KIROGI) in the NW Pacific basin.

    Very unusual. It’s as if the storms were let loose hunting for something.

    Like

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