Unknown magma pool causing ground uplift in Oregon

January 4, 2012OREGONVolcanic activity is causing the earth to rise in Oregon, scientists have found. Though whether such uplift is a sign of an imminent eruption remains uncertain. As early as the summer of 1996, a 230-square-mile (600-square-kilometer) patch of ground in Oregon began to rise. The area lies just west of the South Sister Volcano, which with the North and Middle Sisters form the Three Sisters volcanoes, the most prominent peaks in the central Oregon stretch of the Cascade Mountains. Although this region has not seen an eruption in at least 1,200 years, the scattered hints of volcanic activity here have been a cause of concern, leading to continuous satellite-based monitoring. Now 14 years of data is revealing just how the Earth is changing there and the likely cause of the uplift — a reservoir of magma invading the crust 3-to-4 miles (5-to-7 km) underground. The European Space Agency’s European Remote Sensing and Envisat radar satellites revealed that the terrain deformed in three distinct phases since this uplift began. From 1996 to 1998, the ground rose by 0.4 inches (1 cm) per year. Then, from 1998 to 2004, uplift grew to 1.2-to-1.6 inches (3-to-4 cm) annually. However, for the rest of the decade, uplift declined to only a few millimeters per year, for a total of 9.8 inches (25 cm) of uplift so far. “The most important implication of our research is that the ground appears to still be uplifting,” said researcher Susan Riddick, a geodesist at the University of Oregon. ‘Previous researchers believed that the ground uplift, a result of the input of magma deep in the Earth’s crust, had stopped at around 2006. We found that the ground is still uplifting as of late 2010 and may still be uplifting, but at a slow rate.” By analyzing precisely how the landscape was changing, the researchers suggest the magma pocket behind this uplift has a volume of 1.76-billion-to-2.47-billion cubic feet (50-million-to-70-million cubic meters), enough to fill 20,000-to-28,000 Olympic-size swimming pools. Since the ground is still rising, “magma may still be accumulating, and as a result, this area needs to be continually monitored to determine whether or not there will be an eruption,” Riddick told OurAmazingPlanet. “If there were to be an eruption, it would probably not be from a pre-existing volcano that we can see because the uplifting ground area is several kilometers from historically active volcanoes,” Riddick added. ‘A new volcanic vent would likely form. Lava would be ejected from a vent and fall to the ground to create a cinder cone, which is a steep conical volcano made of lava fragments. We believe it would be a small eruption, because we calculated that only a relatively small amount of magma has accumulated in the earth’s crust so far.” –Our Amazing Planet
See page 111 in my book on geologist Graham Hill’s findings about massive volcanic magma chamber under the Cascade Mountains. -The Extinction Protocol
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5 Responses to Unknown magma pool causing ground uplift in Oregon

  1. luisport says:

    Ground uplift in Oregon Cascades is tipoff to rising magma

    http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/2001/01_10_11.html

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  2. K says:

    Wow that is incredibke! Oh Alvin I heard someone on another site mentioning the volcano Mt. zukur in the Red Sea erupting, but I am struggling to find any articles on it. they posted a video that stated January 2nd 2012 and it said Saudi navy took the video. Have you heard anything about it? God Bless!

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  3. Bobi becker says:

    My research shows that we are approximately 450 miles, as the crow flies, due west of Yellowstone… Definitely something to think about, wouldn’t you say? Not worried though, possibly just a little inconvenience. LOL

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  4. lorents says:

    bug has it all figured out. ”post glacier rebound effect”

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