Alaska’s Cleveland volcano erupts by unleashing 15,000 ft. ash cloud

December 30, 2011ALASKAAn ash cloud erupted some 15,000 feet into the air from Alaska’s Cleveland Volcano, according to satellite images and the Alaska Volcano Observatory. The volcano, located in the Aleutian Islands about 45 miles west of the community of Nikolski, has been upgraded and downgraded several times over the last few months, flaring up in July and erupting in the form of a growing lava dome in August. Following several weeks of activity, the volcano was downgraded before being upgraded again to an alert level of “watch” and an aviation hazard color-code of “orange” in early September. Two months later, the alert level was again lowered after the volcano seemed to quiet down. This latest activity comes six days after the most recent update on the AVO website. The AVO said that satellite imagery from about 5 a.m. Thursday confirmed the presence of a detached ash cloud, about 50 miles away from the volcano and moving southeast. The last significant eruption of Cleveland occurred in February 2001 and resulted in three ash plumes that reached up to 39,000 feet above sea level and “a rubbly lava flow and hot avalanche that reached the sea.” Aviators in the area are encouraged to exercise caution, but the AVO said that the eruption may be an isolated event. “Satellite data indicate that this is a single explosion event,” the AVO said, “however, more sudden explosions producing ash could occur with plumes exceeding 20,000 feet above sea level. Such explosions and their associated ash clouds may go undetected in satellite imagery for hours.” Cleveland volcano lacks any real-time monitoring equipment. –Alaska Dispatch
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This entry was posted in Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Earthquake Omens?, High-risk potential hazard zone, Potential Earthchange hotspot, Seismic tremors, Volcanic Eruption, Volcano Watch. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Alaska’s Cleveland volcano erupts by unleashing 15,000 ft. ash cloud

  1. Kathy says:

    Once again, Alvin, thanks for the update. It amazes me, that main stream media does not report these events.

    God’s Blessings
    Kathy

    Like

  2. Darlene says:

    It is good to know what is going on in the world..then we know how to pray and stay on our toes! and warn others.

    Like

  3. Michael says:

    Please see
    USGS Open-File Report 2005-1164
    There is a pdf there to download that will tell you some things about Cleveland (and other vols) you may not know. Happy New Year!

    Like

  4. luisport says:

    Updated: Friday, 30 December, 2011 at 20:47 UTC
    Description
    An eruption at Cleveland Volcano in Alaska’s Aleutian Islands sent a cloud of ash 15,000 feet into the air Thursday, prompting a warning to aviation traffic. But the cloud had mostly dissipated by Friday morning. The smoking crater remained on “watch” status, however, with officials at the Alaska Volcano Observatory watching for the possibility of another eruption. A lava dome has been rising in the 5,676-foot peak and sending off warning signs since July. “There is concern that Cleveland is a very, very active volcano. It has been very active over the past year, as well as over the past 10 years, so we are concerned that this type of activity could be repeated,” John Power, scientist in charge for the U.S. Geological Survey at the observatory, told the Los Angeles Times. Thursday’s eruption and the drifting cloud of ash that followed it presented a threat to local aviation traffic in the Aleutians, which are home to one of the nation’s busiest fishing ports, but the cloud did not reach high enough to imperil major commercial jet traffic, which typically flies above 25,000 feet. Cleveland’s most significant recent eruption, in 2001, sent ash clouds soaring up to 39,000 feet, along with a rubbly lava flow and hot avalanche that reached the sea, according to the observatory’s report on its website. “More sudden explosions producing ash could occur with plumes exceeding 20,000 feet above sea level. Such explosions and their associated ash clouds may go undetected in satellite imagery for hours,” the report warned. Cleveland has historically been hard to monitor; it lies on uninhabited Chuginadak Island more than 900 miles southwest of Anchorage, and scientists have no ground instrumentation, such as seismometers or global positioning system equipment, to gather detailed data. The nearest community, Nikolski, about 45 miles to the east with a permanent resident population of 18, was not considered threatened. Power said USGS officials are waiting to gather additional satellite imagery before officially downgrading the volcano’s current “orange-watch” status.

    http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/site/?pageid=event_update_read&edis_id=VE-20111229-33584-USA&uid=12026

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