Exhibiting signs of awakening: two volcanoes under watch in the Aleutians

Aleutian Volcanoes The Extinction Protocol
June 2015 ALASKA Satellite imagery shows elevated surface temperatures in the summit crater at Cleveland Volcano, roughly 140 miles west of Dutch Harbor. John Power is the Scientist in Charge at the Alaska Volcano Observatory. “So, we’re seeing warm ground, increased thermal activity at the summit.  Some of the radar images that we have suggested that new lava has been extruded forming a small lava dome in the volcano summit crater.” Scientists at the AVO have raised the alert level for Cleveland to ‘advisory.’  The aviation color code has also been set to yellow.
“We have heightened the alert levels at Cleveland so that folks are aware that there is the possibility of increased hazards associated with any eruptive activity that might occur beyond what’s apparently already gone on.” Cleveland volcano has been extremely active for the past decade. Power says it’s one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Chain. But the majority of that activity has come in the way of small, long-term, low-level eruptions. A similar scenario is playing out roughly 125 miles to the east of Dutch Harbor at Mt. Shishaldin.
“What we see there is Shishaldin has a very deep summit crater and down in the bottom there’s activity going on. We see increased temperatures again in satellite imagery and we believe that there’s active magma pooling deep inside that summit crater.” Shishaldin is the tallest volcano in the Aleutians, towering more than 9000 feet above sea level. The alert level there is currently set to ‘watch.’ The aviation color code is orange. Power says the volcano occasional emits small amounts of ash.  He says Shishaldin has been in a low-level state of eruption for over a year. Despite the recent increase in activity, Power says there’s no indication of any major eruptions from any of the volcanic centers throughout the Aleutian Chain. –Alaska Public Media
AlaskaEarthquake reported A moderate magnitude5.8 earthquake has rocked south-central Alaska on, but the U.S. Geological Survey says there’s little likelihood of damage. Wednesday afternoon’s quake was initially reported with a magnitude of 5.6, but scientists later revised the measurement. The West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center says the earthquake isn’t expected to cause a tsunami. The quake at 2:34 p.m. caused computer monitors to sway and rattled buildings in Anchorage, Alaska’s largest city. The epicenter was 75 miles northwest of Anchorage and 72 miles deep. The quake was centered in a mountainous area with few people, and the USGS says most structures in the region are resistant to damage from shaking. –ABC News
This entry was posted in Dormant fault activation, Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Earthquake Omens?, Extreme Weather Event, Glacial fracture, Glacial Melt, High-risk potential hazard zone, Magnetic pole migration, New volcanic activity, Potential Earthchange hotspot, Prophecies referenced, Record high temperatures, Signs of Magnetic Field weakening, Time - Event Acceleration, Volcano unrest, Volcano Watch. Bookmark the permalink.

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