Liberia thinks it needs 84,000 more body bags for the Ebola outbreak – cases likely 2.5 times higher than reported

October 2014 LIBERIA Earlier today, the Liberian government published a list of the supplies it has on hand to treat Ebola patients — and the supplies it thinks it will need. The data paints a dire picture of a country bracing for an outbreak that only gets worse. The Liberian government estimates it needs an additional 84,841 body bags. It currently has 4,901 on hand. The West African country also needs more than 2 million boxes of rubber gloves and a half-million pairs of goggles and tens of thousands more pairs of rubber boots. Right now, it has very little of any of these. Liberia has been harder hit by the Ebola outbreak than any other country. It has so far recorded 4,076 cases and 2,316 deaths. More than half of all Ebola deaths worldwide have happened in Liberia. The country is also poor, with few resources to fight the deadly outbreak. Even before Ebola hit, Liberia had one of the world’s poorest health care systems. Liberia spends an average of $66 per person per year on health care — a mere 2 percent of the OECD average. Supplies matter a lot in the Ebola outbreak. Without proper protective gear, it’s easier for the disease to spread — not just in Liberia, but also outside of the country, too. If you’re looking for ways to help ease the supply shortage, consider this list of non-profits currently providing aid in West Africa in the Ebola fight.

We have no idea how bad the Ebola outbreak actually is

While official estimates suggest there are already more than 8,000 cases of Ebola this year, the real number is likely much, much higher. “Under-reporting” has been a constant feature of the world’s worst Ebola epidemic. Cases have gone missing, deaths are uncounted, and “there is widespread under-reporting of new cases,” warns the World Health Organization. The WHO has continually said that even its current dire numbers don’t reflect the full reality. The estimated 8,000-plus Ebola cases in West Africa could just be the tip of the iceberg. To get to this point, Dr. David Fisman, an infectious disease modeler working on Ebola, summed up: “A person needs to have recognized symptoms, seek care, be correctly diagnosed, get lab testing — if they’re going to be a confirmed case — have the clerical and bureaucratic apparatus actually transmit that information to the people doing surveillance. At each step along the way the case can fall out of the pool of ‘counteds.” There’s no way to know how vastly under-reported this epidemic is, but there are estimates being floated around. Comparing surveillance figures with actual hospital beds dedicated to Ebola care in West Africa, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggested that under-reporting could be happening at a rate of 2.5. This means that every one case reported equals 2.5 on the ground. If true, today’s 8,000 Ebola cases could actually look more like 20,000. –Vox
This entry was posted in Black Swan Event, Civilizations unraveling, Dark Ages, Disease outbreak, Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Ecology overturn, Emerging disease threat, Environmental Threat, Extinction Threat, Health guideliness issued, High-risk potential hazard zone, Human behavioral change after disaster, Infrastructure collapse, New virus reported, Pestilence Watch, Potential Earthchange hotspot, Prophecies referenced, Quarantine, Time - Event Acceleration. Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to Liberia thinks it needs 84,000 more body bags for the Ebola outbreak – cases likely 2.5 times higher than reported

  1. I think that 20’000 is only the tip of the iceberg. Daniel in Africa

    Like

  2. Dennis E. says:

    First, I am sorry for any recent rants. Stress relief to willing ears………

    So, here I go again……….Do not believe the government when it says everything is under control.
    DO YOUR OWN RESEARCH. Take matters into your own hands in regard to personal protection from this virus and the others to include the Marburg, virus.

    Every service is going to be disrupted…………to include food…………..deliveries……….
    Disruptions are starting now in travel………….
    I am no prophet…………But we pray for wisdom from above…………….

    Have a nice day……….

    Like

  3. Janice says:

    EBOLA IS A GLOBAL PROBLEM.  AFRICA IS A GLOBAL PROBLEM

    Finally there is a “natural resources” out of Africa the World does NOT want.  

    America, Europe, China should provide EVERYTHING needed to fight Ebola.  If only to save  our own skins.  Liberia is already sacrificing it’s own precious human capital resource.
    The World had better step up big time & with a quickness. Ebola self-transports, keeps on replicating & replenishes itself.  Africa’s Ebola has the capacity to take us all out.

    Not to diminish the non-profit services provided in Liberia… NGOs receive millions in USAID yearly.   In addition, millions go to American private, for profit businesses to provide services yearly. Other countries also provide “aid” to Africa.

    BILLIONS are spent throughout Africa by USAID yearly.  Businesses/corporations  reap BILLIONS in contracts, trade & commerce…yearly.

    So why are parts of Africa so “poor, uneducated &  backward”.  Why can’t Africa “take care of itself”?

    The scandalous tragedy of Ebola in Africa/Liberia is that…America, Europe, China continue to build their wealth from the rich natural resources in Africa.  There has never been interest or investment in the African people.   All the World wanted was/is Africa’s natural resources.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yellow Bird says:

      im reading tweets by a couple news correspondents connected in west africa, liberia and nigeria specifically… they say that many folks in those nations are utterly exasperated at global (largely american/euro) media’s quickness to make sweeping statements of the poor/uneducated/backward/helpless sort. having never been there, i obviously dont really know what its like… but i am starting to hear what people there are saying, and its something else that doesnt exactly match the mainstream picture.

      Like

  4. Bone Idle says:

    Reports are coming in that Ebola has reached the South East Asian country of Papua New Guinea. This is mostly a stone age country. Africa’s culture and health support network is far advanced than a lot of areas of P.N.G.
    If an outbreak occurs in the interior of P.N.G. there will be a wipeout of many indignant people.

    The cart has bolted. We are starting to see the first signs of panic in the politicos in Washington and Europe. Political Correctness has stymied the effort to keep this contained. If a Pandemic flares in western countries there may be a use for lamp poles for ultra liberal politicians

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yellow Bird says:

      doesnt it seem rather odd that ebola would crop up in such a rural locale before it strikes urban travel centers anywhere else in the world?
      i couldnt find a single verified story, only typical “Pro-Majority” blither on what steps AUSTRALIA would take should ebola pop up across “their porous border”.
      rather like a lot of the unfortunately pc rhetoric “what to do about america’s southern border”

      suspecting ebola will appear in Sydney long before it makes it to any other part of the continent…

      Like

  5. Yellow Bird says:

    here’s a series of ebola related articles written from a variety of perspectives by assorted folks who have actual personal experiences in West Africa:
    http://www.culanth.org/fieldsights/585-ebola-in-perspective

    Like

    • Yellow Bird says:

      more evidence that things do look different at Ground Zero than the rest of the world is being led to believe. its definitely not good -but neither is it mass hysteria or the helplessness of utter ignorance! These people are FAR more socially networked, in a real and tangible way, than we are being given to know… and dare i say, dealing with an utterly hellish situation far better than we “civilized sorts” likely will once we must…
      http://matsutas.wordpress.com/2014/10/14/can-sirleaf-survive-ebola-political-legitimacy-and-government-response-to-the-ebola-crisis-in-liberia-by-mary-moran/
      “…Even in densely settled urban neighborhoods, Liberians have been turning to techniques developed during the dark days of the civil war, when neighborhood self help groups organized fair and equitable food distribution networks for desperately needed supplies that had not yet arrived; mapping streets, identifying the most vulnerable, and setting up access points even when they had nothing to hand out.
      The New York Times reported on the work of Dr. Mosoka Fallah, a young epidemiologist and immunologist who is working with community leaders and existing organizers in Monrovia to set up volunteer surveillance teams to identify ebola cases and delimit their contacts. Reports of neighbors banding together to deliver food, at a safe distance, to people who are sick in their homes (and not able to find a bed in one of the few government treatment centers) are largely drowned out by the deluge of articles on “irrational” villagers driving off health care workers, but they are there if you look for them.
      Along with providing a counter-narrative to the tropes of primitive Africa, these stories are also evidence of the crisis of legitimacy in Liberia, as people turn from looking to their government and fall back on their own resources…”

      Like

  6. Debbie says:

    Just made a donation they need money to overtake this horrible disease. My prayers are with everyone on the front lines. Please be safe. Thanks Alvin for all your reports! Im prepping hope I’m ready. I will help anyone that needs it cause it is just that kind of disease that takes strong people to defeat it. i’m praying for strenght.

    Like

  7. deniseandros says:

    What we do know is that Obama’s hatred for America is so virulent that he has brought Ebola to our land and has exposed our soldiers to it as well. Could he be the rider on the pale horse?

    Like

All comments are moderated. We reserve the right not to post any comment deemed defamatory, inappropriate, or spam.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s