Second Ebola case reported in U.S. – healthcare worker at Dallas hospital has tested positive for virus

October 2014 DALLAS, TX – (RNN) – A second person in the U.S. has tested positive for Ebola. A Dallas healthcare worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital has tested positive, CNN reported early Sunday. This comes less than a week after the first person to test positive in the U.S., Thomas Duncan, died of Ebola in that Dallas hospital. –WTVM
Nurse was wearing full protective gear: A health care worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital has tested positive for Ebola after a preliminary test, the state’s health agency said in a statement. Confirmatory testing will be conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. The employee helped care for Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States. Duncan died on Wednesday. “We knew a second case could be a reality, and we’ve been preparing for this possibility,” Dr. David Lakey, commissioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services, said in a statement Sunday morning. “We are broadening our team in Dallas and working with extreme diligence to prevent further spread.”
If confirmed by the CDC, the health care worker’s case would mark the second diagnosis of Ebola ever in the United States. Globally, the disease has wrought catastrophic consequences. The World Health Organization estimates more than 8,300 have contracted Ebola during the current outbreak. Of those, more than 4,000 people have died. Three countries — Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia — have been hardest hit.
The employee in question that initially tested positive helped care for Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person ever diagnosed with Ebola in the United States. Duncan died Wednesday. The health care worker is in stable condition, Texas Health Resources chief clinical officer Dan Varga said. The worker was involved in Duncan’s second visit to the hospital, when he was admitted for treatment, and was wearing protective gear as prescribed by the CDC — gown, gloves, mask and shield, Varga said. A “close contact” of the worker has been “proactively” placed in isolation, Varga added. CNN
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36 Responses to Second Ebola case reported in U.S. – healthcare worker at Dallas hospital has tested positive for virus

  1. Melissa says:

    Did they care for him on his first visit when he was sent home or on his second visit… I believe that’s extremely important. First visit would be kinda expected that someone get it… second visit, IF it isn’t airborne like they say… NO ONE should get it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • aaronwt says:

      Only if protocols are followed to the letter, every day, every minute, and every second of the day. One little mistake, and all bets are off. And unfortunately it is very easy to make a mistake. Since all products, linen, waste, food, water etc. associated with any Ebola patient can be a cause of infection. And the more people dealing with these things each day, the more likely a mistake will be made and the more likely that a person will be infected.

      Like

  2. andy says:

    In this age of “sweet” nerve racking S&M “news” provided to a needy bored out of their minds western public, lets gather some sanity and remember that there is no pandemic, and all cases have been taking place in one geographic location of 3-4 African countries. All other “global” incidents were people who contracted this virus in the original epidemic location and then traveled with it somewhere else and sometimes infected those who cared for them using improper precautions. The same reasons why it spreads causing epidemic among population in original location.

    Liked by 1 person

    • davidh7426 says:

      Andy… Are you saying that it only counts if you become infected in Africa, and that if your infected anywhere else it doesn’t matter.

      Because that’s the way your comment reads to me… Infected is infected, location doesn’t make it any less dangerous to the worlds population.

      Or maybe I’m misreading your comment.

      Like

    • Yellow Bird says:

      no pandemic in history began as one.
      one is wise to take the lessons of the past and apply them toward a potential future

      Like

  3. justsaying says:

    nice one Obama, well played. Idiot.

    Like

  4. Joseph Unik says:

    Here we go. Who knows how many others have it. My plan is to lockdown once it is within 3 or 4 counties away from me. Beans, Boots, Bullets … and maybe a Bedini generator

    Like

  5. Dennis E. says:

    And as I blog this, Officials in Dallas are monitoring 48 people and one of the spokes person
    said that they were really concerned about this 2nd patient, the health worker was wearing
    full Bio-Hazard gear…………….meeting all the CDC requirements…………

    Like

    • drswig says:

      Varga said the health care worker, who requested anonymity, had worn full protective gear when working with Duncan. The worker is among a few dozen who had contact with Duncan and were self-monitoring — watching for symptoms consistent with early signs of Ebola, Varga said. The monitoring guidelines include taking a temperature twice a day.

      Like

      • Maria says:

        The fact that the healthcare workers wear protective gear alone does not guarantee anything if they do not know and follow all the guidlines meticulously. Having worked at hospitals and knowing from close observation how loosely these guidelines are being followed by nurses, nurse assistants, and doctors as they move from one patient to the next patient, I have no false sense of security here. Healthcare workers are probably at the greatest risk of spreading the virus to others.

        Like

    • niebo says:

      “She was involved in Duncan’s care after he was placed in isolation and was wearing protective gear as prescribed by the CDC: gown, gloves, mask and shield, officials said.” (Quoted from the source document)

      Hey, Dennis . . . I think the media’s reporting is only partially true; “after he was placed in isolation” and “as prescribed by the CDC”, according to the CDC’s own protocols for Ebola, do not include gown, gloves, mask, and shield but biocontainment suits with powered respirators (pages 45 and 51, as marked in the document):

      http://www.cdc.gov/biosafety/publications/bmbl5/bmbl5_sect_iv.pdf

      The CDC is violating its own protocols for containment. WHY?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dennis E. says:

        A question that needs answering………

        Just to answer it for my self………improper supervision, lack of knowledge of procedure from inadequate training……..or underestimating the situation…….

        Like

      • Yellow Bird says:

        Niebo… another very good point!

        Like

  6. Joe says:

    There you go, another one that bites the dust, so where are the health officers to protect us?. Is this the begining of the ending?. My advice is to close out these infected countries using military forces and pray to God save America!!

    Like

  7. Janice says:

    Was worker wearing an oxygen respirator pack w/full mask, eye shield/goggles? In other words was worker fully protected in their own self contained oxygenated Hazmat suit?

    Like

  8. Janice says:

    Bio-hazard gear – Hazmat suit:   “Usually ventilated” with it’s own oxygen unit.  
    Not sure the CDC has ordered all healthcare workers to use this level of protective gear.   

    The CDC & WHO continue to say Ebola is not airborne.   In fact this is what the CDC recommends:
    http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/hcp/infection-prevention-and-control-recommendations.html

    CDC SAYS NOTHING ABOUT FULL BIO-HAZARD RESPIRATOR HAZMAT GEAR FOR EBOLA WORKERS.

    BIO-HAZARD SUITS W/PHOTOS. Level A & B.  All Hazmat gear is not air tight.
    http://www.sccfd.org/clothing_hazmat.html

    HAZMAT SUIT:
    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hazmat_suit

    Like

    • niebo says:

      Hey, Janice, PREACH! In the first document of your post, in the “Key Components . . .” section, in the column entitled “Aerosol Generating Procedures (AGP)”, this tidbit appears:

      “HCP should wear gloves, a gown, disposable shoe covers, and either a face shield that fully covers the front and sides of the face or goggles, and respiratory protection that is at least as protective as a NIOSH certified fit-tested N95 filtering facepiece respirator OR HIGHER (e.g., powered air purifying respiratory or elastomeric respirator) during aerosol generating procedures.”

      Now, isn’t it interesting that PAPR units are most often associated with “Positive Pressure Personnel Suits” (which according to this link are used by personnel who study BSL-4 pathogens – – – like Ebola)?

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positive_pressure_personnel_suit

      Also . . . what, exactly, is an “aerosol generating procedure”?

      Er . . . a cough?

      Like

  9. claudiaishis says:

    Nothing like locking down the barn doors after the animals have escaped! I was expecting this because even trained people are not as careful and responsible as they used to be.

    Like

  10. John says:

    One of the ramifications of the fact that this nurse was using proper CDC protocol and still came down with ebola is that just like in Spain, health care providers in America might go on strike, call in sick, and do everything possible to avoid working with future Ebola patients. When this nurse was interviewed she stated that she followed CDC protocol to the letter. However, in CDC’s way of thinking this nurse at a BREACH in CDC protocol. Of course, CDC can’t possibly be wrong. The government is never wrong. Obama is never wrong he just blames the Republicans. Clinton was never wrong, “I never had sex with that woman”. Bush was never wrong, “Read my lips no new taxes”. Obama was never wrong, “You can keep your doctor, you can keep your health insurance”.

    Like

  11. John says:

    The big question for me is at what point do I go into “prepper mode”. At what point do I stop going to WalMart, stop going to church, stop shaking hands with people, stop in general going into the public square? I have a large garden, and food storage, at what point do I start using that as my primary source of food? Is the answer for us preppers, when we see ebola in our home town? Or when we see 5 or 10 more health care workers in Dallas come down with it? Or when we see the ebola popping up in major cities in our country? This is a question that all preppers must ask themselves, what is the criteria that will cause you to go into “prepper mode”?

    Like

    • niebo says:

      Hey, John: a friend of mine says it like this: “Once you have made the decision to take your well-being into your own hands, you ARE in prepper mode.”

      Like

  12. Apple IIGS says:

    What’s troubling is it’s technically impossible for health care workers to become infected in full protective gear. Unless they’ve not been careful, it would seem to suggest Ebola has new means of transmission.

    And what of Duncan’s immediate family, the ambulance techs or police that were around him, and all the people they’ve come in contact with? If they become infected this is suddenly going to explode. If this jumps from 2 cases to dozens of cases in the next few days and weeks, there is going to be panic.

    Like

  13. Judy says:

    How many other employees, patients, friends, & family has this poor person exposed this terrible illness to by now?

    Like

  14. jim says:

    This self monitoring thing is kind of stupid don’t you think if you do have ebola then your whole house is contaminated and so if you die from it isn’t the next person that the house is rented to or sold to contaminated because you know they are probably not going to decontaminate it properly and are they going to let the new people know the house isn’t safe to live in just saying it’s all a possibility in todays world

    Like

  15. stevenj says:

    If…this 2nd person was wearing protective gear…If the gear was disposed of properly with no secondary contamination… Then one has to ask how did she get it? No mention of a respirator – only a face mask. If correct, then it IS airborne and a regular mask isn’t adequate. By mid-November, don’t be surprised if hundreds more are infected in Dallas

    Like

  16. davidh7426 says:

    “Ebola research: Fever not a surefire sign of infection”

    http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-1012-ebola-fever-20141012-story.html#page=1

    Apparently, up to 13% of Ebola sufferers DON’T have a fever…

    And there are growing doubts about when a person may become contagious too.

    Like

  17. Judy Clarke says:

    ….and here we go. This man would have been in contact with hundred as each of us is in a week or more, so get ready for the great spread. LOCK down the airport. NO planes in or out. if they dont do that…..it will world wide. Sound like overkill. WELL ITS NOT.

    Like

  18. jim says:

    I have a question for anyone I haven’t really kept track of the race of the people dying from ebola but is one race more suseptible to the disease seems to me some diseases have preferences they target. I talk about diseases as if they’re people and they are. The invisible warrior you’ll never see it coming

    Like

  19. Patty says:

    I read an article about the ebola virus being a “something”-4 and typically most viruses are a “something”-3 type. He said that regular PPE gear will not provide the safety necessary and that the type 4 virus needed coverage with oxygen and heavy non-porous suiting. If that is the case, what is really the transmission point? Skin is the perfect protection suit and yet, with the vast and quick transmissions of ebola between people, it seems like it spreads in the manner of the norovirus….which can sicken a care unit very quickly. Not all these people in Africa had cuts or put their hands with blood, etc. into their eyes, ears, or mouth each time and this lady was in full PPE and probably very concienscious of what she was doing. This really is not fearmongering at this point – it is an actual happening. Our pride definitely is going before our fall – hospitals are notorious viral and bacterial breeders. And still no articles about how so many people are on their knees at “now-full” churches rending their hearts and repenting like in the good ole days. I guess we’ll have to see a lot worse before that happens. So sad for us.

    Like

  20. DJ says:

    W.H.O. 10/5/14 report says 401 healthcare workers have been infected with Ebola virus and 232 of them have died.
    Healthcare workers need to get together [internationally] and pressure U.N. and all governments for better protection for us all. Anyone dealing with Ebola patients should wear BSL4 suits.
    Clearly no place is ready for Ebola and there should be travel bans to/from affected countries as well as stricter quarantines for contacts, journalists, aid workers etc.

    Like

    • aaronwt says:

      The infection rates just don’t bear that out. Infection rates for Ebola are low. For an airborne disease it would be, much, much, much higher.

      Like

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