Scientists mystified why Northern California earthquake was felt across such a large area

May 25, 2013 CALIFORNIAA magnitude 5.7 temblor Thursday night was the largest earthquake to shake California since 2008 and has generated curiosity from seismologists. The temblor occurred in a rugged section of Northern California that has not been studied as thoroughly as Southern California and the Bay Area and has less monitoring equipment. Experts said they were surprised the quake was felt over such a large area, and they plan to go to the region to investigate. The magnitude 5.7 quake struck around 8:47 p.m., about 150 miles northeast of Sacramento; its epicenter was about 27 miles southwest of the town of Susanville. The last quake of similar magnitude, recorded at 5.5, struck Chino Hills in San Bernardino County in July 2008, said David Schwartz, an earthquake geologist for the Northern California USGS division in Menlo Park. It caused little damage, but it was the most sizable quake to hit a metropolitan part of California since the much larger and destructive 1994 Northridge quake. Thursday’s quake did occur in a zone with known active faults, said David Schwartz, an earthquake geologist for the Northern California USGS division, including a series of faults that extend through the northern end of Lake Tahoe all the way to Oregon. But 5.7 is the strongest magnitude recorded in the area. This mountainous eastern Sierra Nevada region, known for its lakes, rivers and national forests, has had about seven magnitude 4 earthquakes since the 1930s, Schwartz said. Scientists are still studying the intensity of Thursday’s shaking and have moved seismographs there from more populated areas to monitor aftershocks. Within minutes of the first quake, more than 7,000 people reported feeling it, from across state borders into Oregon and Nevada and as far south as the San Francisco area, according to the U.S. Geological Survey website. Officials in Susanville and Sacramento said the quake set off a number of home and car alarms and rattled windows. A Chico resident told The Times he felt a slow roll that lasted about 30 seconds.The quake itself was not a huge surprise for Schwartz’s USGS division, but “what was interesting was it was felt along an unusual distance,” he said. “Earthquakes in different parts of the state are felt over different distances. We just haven’t had that many examples of earthquakes in this part of the state, really, for comparison. There are more interesting questions now than we have answers for, at present,” he said. –LA Times
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This entry was posted in Black Swan Event, Civilizations unraveling, Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Earthquake Omens?, High-risk potential hazard zone, Magma Plume activity, Potential Earthchange hotspot, Seismic tremors, Signs of Magnetic Field weakening, Tectonic plate movement, Time - Event Acceleration, Volcano Watch. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Scientists mystified why Northern California earthquake was felt across such a large area

  1. Rae says:

    I always smile when science tries to explain God’s creation and why it does what it does. We think as humans that having 6000 years ( or more) of human intelligence we can figure things out and we are always left with more questions than answers. 🙂

    “Do you not know? Have you not heard? The LORD is the everlasting God, the Creator of the ends of the earth. He will not grow tired or weary, and his understanding no one can fathom”

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  2. jason says:

    I guess that 6.5 in eureka california 2010 never actually happened. Or maybe humboldt county isn’t considered part of ca. Haha!

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  3. Wow!

    On Sat, May 25, 2013 at 2:27 PM, The Extinction Protocol: 2012 and beyond wrote:

    > ** > The Extinction Protocol posted: “May 25, 2013 CALIFORNIA – A > magnitude 5.7 temblor Thursday night was the largest earthquake to shake > California since 2008 and has generated curiosity from seismologists. The > temblor occurred in a rugged section of Northern California that has not > been “

    Like

  4. Shepherd says:

    Nation will rise against nation and kingdom against kingdom,
    and there will be great earthquakes
    and in various places plagues and famines
    and there will be terrors and great signs from heaven.
    Luke 21

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  5. niebo says:

    That area borders the Sierra Nevada batholith, an expansive core of granite that is the heart of the mountains (and then some), so much of northeast California (into Nevada) lies on solid rock. My working theory is that, maybe, just maybe, when a seismic wave shakes a slab of rock, the whole slab moves, so the wave is distributed rather than absorbed.

    Susanville is marked, link 1, figure 2:

    https://pangea.stanford.edu/research/groups/structure/research.php?rg_id=33&rgpr_id=50

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