16 Responses to North Korea warns its citizens, cell phone users will be treated as ‘war criminals’

  1. nickk0 says:

    Wow.
    This must be part of “Junior’s” attempt to impose his imprint & contribution, upon their perfect Communist society.

    Like

  2. Trev says:

    Do you mean satellite phones?
    They don’t have cell phone coverage whatsoever, so the story doesn’t make any sense

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  3. Lance says:

    Makes sense. The don’t want the liberal humanists of western society taking over.

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  4. Mike H says:

    This story will be coming to your America soon, stay tuned for updates, now back to the regularly scheduled load of BS in this insane world???

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  5. Grandpa says:

    The US isnt far away.

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  6. Quebec, Canada says:

    How’s that about enlightment??

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  7. Zach says:

    This isn’t right. People should have the freedom to communicate. As sadistic as this may sound, perhaps the answer is violently liberating the country, but even if we were to invade and take down the entire hierarchy, the civilians would build a religion around the their fallen dictators and make the US look like a portal to hell. Ugh.

    Like

  8. Moco says:

    What doesn’t make sense if this illegal then why would there be cell towers? No signal, then can’t use phone. Sounds weird and smells fishy.

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    • Anonymous says:

      This is just half of the story. The summary does not state it’s temporary enforced as they go through a transitioning process and less than 1% of the people in north Korea have cellphones. So does it really matter? If you think about it, the people who have cellphones are mostly generals or high status government officials

      Like

    • Erik says:

      because the people in power do use cell phones:P

      Like

    • andrea says:

      Emergency calls only!

      Like

    • BZ says:

      There’s reception near the borders of China and SK.
      Politicians and high ranked army officers have certain privileges.
      I don’t know if there are cell towers but if there are, they are for the above mentioned groups.

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    • Christov says:

      Moco is correct, its clearly pure propaganda, why would any nation go to the expense of putting in a cell network in the first place only to ban its citizens from using it.

      Like

  9. Irene C says:

    So true Moco, shut down the towers and you shut down the cell phones. Unless one lives close enough to a S. Korean tower to get a signal, or one has a satphone (satellite phone). Those connect directly to the satellites and don’t rely on towers. However, they are expensive and these repressed people are impoverished. I will remain thankful for whatever freedoms I still have.

    Maranatha

    Like

  10. Tim says:

    ~ N.Korea Struggling Under Mountains of Foreign Debt
    North Korea is struggling to free itself from a mountain of debt the economic basket case incurred mainly from friendly communist countries during the Cold War. The North has failed to repay the principal and interest on the loans from almost all creditor countries. It has borrowed huge amounts of money from European banks but has not paid off most of the debt, and some of the banks have put the North on a blacklist and even refuse to receive fresh savings deposits from the regime.
    http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2012/01/19/2012011900864.html

    ~ N.Korea Offers to Pay Czech Debts with Ginseng
    North Korea has offered to pay part of its debts to the Czech Republic in ginseng instead of cash. The total debt amounts to $10 million. Czech Deputy Finance Minister Tomas Zidek said his government is trying to persuade North Korea to pay it back in zinc, which would be immediately cashable in the international market. A North Korean delegation is apparently headed to the Czech Republic carrying ginseng samples.
    http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2010/07/29/2010072900354.html

    ~ N.Korea Asked Hungary to Write Off Debt
    North Korea asked Hungary to write off more than 90 percent of its outstanding debt. It quoted a Hungarian government official as saying, “They asked [us] to take good consideration of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s current economic difficulties and asked for cancellation of over 90 percent of the total”
    http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2010/08/20/2010082000353.html

    Like

  11. tellthetruth1 says:

    Nothing’s any better there, then…

    Like

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