Hundreds evacuate as activity rises at Indonesia’s Mount Lewotolok volcano

January 6, 2012Kupang, INDONESIAHundreds of people living near a volcano in the Indonesian province of East Nusa Tenggara were evacuated on Thursday because of increased volcanic activity, the Antara news agency reported. About 500 people residing near Mount Lewotolok in Lembata district abandoned their homes amid the volcano’s mounting activity. “Most of them left for the nearest city, Lewoleba,” said Lembata Deputy District Chief Viktor Mado Watun, as quoted by Antara. “All related government officials will soon hold a coordination meeting to deal with the latest situation. Black smoke columns are coming out of the mountain’s crater, the air is filled with the smell of sulfur while rumbling sounds are heard around the mountain,” he added. Residents decided to leave due to the increasing activity of Mount Lewotolok over the past few days, even though the government has not yet announced an evacuation plan. Viktor said ten villages are likely to be affected and suffer material losses if the volcano erupts. On January 2, the country’s Volcanology and Geology Disaster Mitigation Center (PVMBG) raised the alert level at the volcano to level 3. The center uses a warning system with four levels of alerts, with level 1 being the lowest and level 4 being the highest. Dozens of active volcanoes in Indonesia are part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, known for frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. One of Indonesia’s most active volcanoes is Mount Merapi, which is located on the island of Java near Jogjakarta, the country’s second-most visited area after Bali. In 2010, more than 300 people were killed in a series of eruptions between October and November which also displaced over 300,000 people. –Channel 6 News
Over the last few weeks, the Indonesian archipelago has been rattled by a spasm of tremors which is one more indication that geological activity is intensifying in the Pacific Ring of Fire. We expect to see more unrest among Indonesia’s saturated landscape of volcanoes. Mount Lewotolok stands at a height of 1423 meters (4,669 feet) and last erupted in 1951.The Extinction Protocol
This entry was posted in Civilizations unraveling, Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Earthquake Omens?, High-risk potential hazard zone, Magma Plume activity, Potential Earthchange hotspot, Seismic tremors, Volcanic Eruption, Volcano Watch. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Hundreds evacuate as activity rises at Indonesia’s Mount Lewotolok volcano

  1. This is yet another example of global warming. What can be done to prevent this from getting worse?

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    • E

      It’s not a man-made issue, Colleen. This is based on processes occurring within the planet’s interior acting, in some cases, in concert with space weather and stellar energy exchanges. The Earth vents heat through convection, its volcanoes (70% of which are under the ocean and unseen by man), and magma plumes. This prevents Earth from cracking open like an egg because internal pressures and gradient is so great within its interior. During a magnetic reversal, this process is exaggerated. There is nothing we can do to prevent it from getting worse. We are all tied to the earth and depend on it for sustenance but that relationship too, is being overturned as the ecology crashes in concert with ever more erratic and unpredicatble weather patterns. Once growing seasons begin to vanish in the hemispheres just as I warned they would, human extinction is not far behind.

      Alvin

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