Geologist warn tremor a reminder big earthquake is in Montanta’s future

December 3, 2011MONTANAA small earthquake was reported in central Montana on Thursday evening, located not too far from Neihart. Initial reports indicate that it was a magnitude 3.0 and it was centered about 24 miles east-southeast of Neihart. The quake occurred at 5:37 p.m. at a reported depth of 3.3 miles; there were no reports of damage or injuries associated with this small quake. Montana is no stranger to seismic activity, but the majority of it occurs in southwest and western Montana. According to Michael Stickney, director of the Earthquake Studies Office at the Montana Bureau of Mines & Geology in Butte, four to five small earthquakes happen in the Treasure State every day, but most can’t be felt. Stickney said, “There is a seismic belt, known as the Intermountain Seismic Belt, which passes through the western one third of the state. Small earthquakes are very common within this zone, which runs more or less from Yellowstone Park up to about Flathead Lake.” While most quakes occur west of the Continental Divide, central and eastern Montana has seen very minor quakes in the past. Allan Rabbitt, from the National Ski Patrol’s Northern Division, says that while it’s rare, a strong earthquake could trigger an avalanche on Montana’s mountains. However, snow enthusiasts in the central part of the state shouldn’t be concerned, since it’s uncommon for large tremors in that area. A large quake hasn’t rocked Big Sky Country in over 25 years, but geologists are confident it’ll happen again. Stickney said, “Although we cannot predict the timing of earthquakes, we know that of the 45 or so potentially active faults in western Montana, that at some point in the future, earthquakes will occur along those faults.” Right now, Stickney says there’s no evidence suggesting a large, devastating earthquake is in the state’s near future, but he adds the next big one could happen without any warning. –KRTV
Oklahoma rattled by more tremors: According to the U.S. Geological Survey, two small earthquakes have hit central Oklahoma. The Associated Press reports that both of the tremors were centered in Lincoln County, Okla., and hit between 10:42 and 11:05 last night. The first was recorded as a 2.7 magnitude earthquake. According to geologists, quakes between 2.5 and 3.0 magnitudes are the smallest that humans are able to feel. Striking about six miles west northwest of the town of Prague, the latter quake was a 2.3 magnitude recording with an epicenter was five miles southeast of Sparks. No injuries were reported. –All Media 
 Virginia hit by tremor: A Virginia earthquake today was felt in neighboring Kentucky. The Virginia earthquake today Saturday, December 03, 2011 struck before sunrise. No reports of injuries have been detailed by local news. Shortly after 6 am local time, Virginia experienced a 3.1 magnitude quake today. The quake, however, had virtually no depth, USGS reports to news. The quake struck roughly three miles below the earth’s surface. The quake was felt in Virginia and sections of Kentucky. The quake was centered eight miles from Raven and Richlands, Virginia, USGS reports to news. The quake was also ten miles northwest of Cedar Bluff. Pikeville, Kentucky was only forty miles east of the quake, and Winston Salem, North Carolina was centered roughly one hundred north west, UGS indicates to news. –Lalate News
This entry was posted in Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Earthquake Omens?, Seismic tremors. Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Geologist warn tremor a reminder big earthquake is in Montanta’s future

  1. Nikkoale says:

    There was a small (3.1) earthquake in Virginia today (Dec. 3) in the far western part of the state. I don’t think it was an aftershock from the previous one a few months ago. Too far away.

    http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsus/Maps/US2/36.38.-83.-81.php

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  2. PAT2 says:

    Also a 3.1 (or 3.2) earthquake in Raven Virginia today 12/3/11.

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  3. Tim says:

    A geological history of the New Madrid Fault and potential damage from future seismic events.

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  4. Irene C says:

    This is the most active I’ve seen the U. S. is quite awhile (not counting California). I’m still watching the New Madrid fault zone. There have been rumblings there recently, although not significant.

    Maranatha

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    • Dennis E. says:

      Irene, Dennis E. Here: Usually each day I go to the USGS site and often I wonder how people can live in some parts of Alaska; Also I learned today that the MOON has moon quakes.
      Each day a learning experience.

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  5. Tim says:

    Fracking wells all around 3.1 Virgina Quake epicenter.

    What the F is Fracking?
    http://green4u.wordpress.com/2011/11/07/what-the-f-is-fracking/

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  6. Ken says:

    High pressure water injection into the shale rock of the crustal base in order to “fracture” the shale and release the trapped gas. Very dangerous! The crust is weakened and now any stress will further damage the fractured crust causing the mantle to push up through. The gases also get into the water table and has caused fire from the water if ignited. (Drink up!)

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  7. Wiseguy says:

    Two strong and shallow quakes on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, something is brewing…

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  8. Amy P. says:

    M 5.2 2011/12/04 15:35 Depth 10.1 km BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR, MEXICO
    08:35:39 AM at epicenter
    Very shallow earthquake below a wilderness area. Closest villages are El Pabellon (10 km) and El Renegado (15 km).
    50 km (31 miles) WNW (289°) from Loreto, Baja California Sur, Mexico

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