Shallow 4.8 magnitude earthquake strikes south of San Antonio, Texas

October 20, 2011CAMPBELLTON, TexasAn earthquake centered in Campbellton, Texas shook the area early Thursday morning, which reportedly rattled homes and caused faint tremors in downtown San Antonio. Preliminary reports from the U.S. Geological Survey said the 4.8-magnitude earthquake hit at 7:24 a.m. in the area about 50 miles south of San Antonio at a shallow depth of 3 km. According to The Associated Press, no injuries or major damage was reported. Many residents close to the epicenter apparently did not notice any tremors, near Karnes City. Yet small vibrations felt in San Antonio did cause occupants to briefly evacuate a downtown federal building as a precaution. The USGS world map of earthquakes shows this is the only earthquake to have happened Thursday. Many of the North American earthquakes that happened within the last week popped up in Hawaii and Alaska. Earthquakes are not common in Texas, and according to the USGS, Texas — along with several other states — has not had an earthquake with a magnitude of 3.5 or greater for at least 30 years. The USGS site indicates the state has seen only one historic earthquake, which happened near Valentine and had a 5.8 magnitude. –KXAN
contribution Luisport
This entry was posted in Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Seismic tremors. Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to Shallow 4.8 magnitude earthquake strikes south of San Antonio, Texas

  1. Folks I think we are about to be called home. Earthquakes,wars,volcano’s,Christians being killed worldwide revolutions and failing economies. I for one can’t wait to be called HOME, to bow at the feet of my Lord Jesus! Praise him wonderful name!

    Peace,Love and Blessings to all in Jesus name stay safe!

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  2. nickk0 says:

    “The USGS world map of earthquakes shows this is the only earthquake to have happened Thursday”.

    I am assuming they are referring to just the United States, and not the world ?? 😕

    – Nick

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  3. rby86 says:

    I hear a lot about fracking having something to do with this, like in Arkansas and other places where fracking is done.

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  4. jones2012 says:

    The lack of earthquake activity is just one of the reasons I moved to Texas! As a former Californian, I still remember the 1971 Northridge quake and all the aftershocks. I think San Antonio is a little far south of the North American Craton. These are interesting times!

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  5. elsa schrabeck says:

    I Lift-up to you this place Oh God,in the Mighty Name of Jesus …..

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  6. I saw this on the USGS site this morning and was looking forward to seeing your post on it. I was not disappointed. Thank you Alvin.

    Maranatha

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  7. Dutchsince (u-tube) says this is a man made quake caused by fracking. We do terrible damage to our planet Alvin, and never want to take responsibility.
    10/20/2011 — Texas 4.7 magnitude earthquake = MAN MADE = fracking well at epicenter
    Proof (screenshots from google earth) of a fracking well at the epicenter of the Texas 4.7 magnitude earthquake — now revised down to a 4.6M.

    Here is the link : http://sincedutch.wordpress.com/2011/10/20/10202011-texas-4-7-magnitude-earthquake-man-made-epicenter-at-fracking-well

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  8. Susan D. says:

    I live in rural Mississippi and last night at about 10 PM I had noticed that a decorative glass “house” we keep in our den started rattling. My husband and I looked at each other because there seemed to be no apparent cause for it. I was late and the house was very quiet. We live in the middle of nowhere–no trucks, planes or trains nearby. We shrugged it off but later I couldn’t help but wonder if it was a very small tremor. Nothing ever showed up on the USGS site, which I visit often. I guess if it was anything it was too small to register. We aren’t too terribly far from the New Madrid fault, but nothing happened there either. I don’t know what it was.

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  9. nancy says:

    A 4.0 just happened in San Francisco near Berkeley – quakes in Washington state last week and off the Oregon coast shortly before signal some serious restlessness in the earth on our west coast. Add in the “rare” New Mexico and Texas quakes this week and North America seems very unsteady indeed!

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  10. xdrfox says:

    San Francisco jolted, as California drills Big One

    (AFP) – 2 hours ago

    SAN FRANCISCO — San Francisco was jolted by a 3.9-magnitude earthquake, causing jitters but no injuries on the day California carried out an annual drill for the long-feared Big One.

    The temblor’s epicenter was only two miles (three kilometers) away from Berkeley and the quake was felt across

    San Francisco and the East Bay area, reports said.

    “My hands are still shaking — my heart is just slowing down,” Krys Freeman, a Web manager for Greenbiz in Oakland, told the San Francisco Chronicle minutes after the mid-afternoon quake.

    The relatively minor quake — temblors of up to magnitude 4.0 are recorded regularly in California, but usually further away from population centers — came hours after the state carried out its annual Great California ShakeOut…

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5h4oTFDXvmBfUMZxQ1-Q8Sgoy4uDA?docId=CNG.91dcaf68aa2ea962d1d2f574f976f3bc.41

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  11. Kimberly says:

    Not as strange as you may think. The Balcones Fault starts close to Del Rio and goes to the Waco area, running along IH -35. In and around Austin, and the Hill Country, the surface expression of the fault is known as the Balcones Escarpment Fault Line or the Balcones Fault Zone and continues up along IH-35 into the San Antonio area. Some speculate that the fault is connected with the Ouachita Mountains. Mount Bonnel Fault is located in Austin as well and runs west of IH-35, in the Westlake area. If you visit Wonder Cave in San Marcos, you can actually see the fault line in the ceiling of the cave.

    Kimberly

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