Size of Gulf of Mexico ‘dead-zone’ to triple in size

July 19, 2011LOUISIANA — Researchers measuring the “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico say it is currently about 3,300 square miles but some scientists say it could become much larger. The so-called “dead zone,” caused by nitrogen levels in the gulf related to human activities such as agricultural runoff, occurs when oxygen levels in seawater drop to dangerously low levels, causing severe hypoxia that can potentially result in fish kills and harm marine life. Researchers from Texas A&M University say the size of the dead zone off coastal Louisiana has been routinely monitored for about 25 years while nitrogen levels in the gulf resulting from human activities have tripled over the past 50 years. Some researchers predict the dead zone could exceed 9,400 square miles this year, which would make it one of the largest ever recorded. “This was the first-ever research cruise conducted to specifically target the size of hypoxia in the month of June,” oceanography professor Steve DiMarco said. “The largest areas of hypoxia are still around the Louisiana coast, where you would expect them because of the huge amounts of fresh water still coming down from the Mississippi River.” –DNN
This entry was posted in Acquatic Ecosystem crash, Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Environmental Threat. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Size of Gulf of Mexico ‘dead-zone’ to triple in size

  1. pam says:

    But, gosh, no mention of BP or problems with the oil/corexit and how that may affect dead zones.

    Like

  2. Concerned Citizen says:

    This is one of the most sickening articles you have ever posted. I do not say that with offense intended to you, I mean that as being disgusted reading the “official” news stories you always find and post which the public is intended to trust. People who live there are supposed to feel at fault for this.

    Thank you for all your hard work. This site is truly something else. Been following you since the 2012forums.

    Like

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