Ash from eruption of Mt. Etna closes Catania airport in Sicily

July 9, 2011SICILY – A southern Italian airport was on Saturday closed due to ash from Mount Etna, forcing traffic to be diverted to Palermo, the ANSA news agency said. Catania airport on the east coast of the island of Sicily was not expected to re-open before Sunday morning while the runway was cleared, the report said. The volcano, which currently does not present any risk to local residents, spewed lava on to its southeastern slopes on Saturday afternoon and winds carried the ash further afield. Etna is the highest active volcano in Europe at 3,295 metres (10,810 feet). The last eruption was in May. A massive flood of meltwater from Iceland’s Myrdalsjoekull glacier, meanwhile, has raised fears of an eruption from the powerful Katla volcano there. –MSN
Time Anomaly? Bemused Sicilians, meanwhile, were quick to blame the volcano after thousands noticed that their clocks were running 15 minutes fast. The fast forward time keeping has affected a wide spectrum of digital clocks and watches – from computers through to alarm clocks. It was spotted when large numbers of locals started turning up for work early, and a Facebook. As well as Etna’s volcanic activity, users have so far blamed aliens, poltergeists, solar explosions and electrical disturbances caused by underwater cables. The cause of the island-wide clock confusion remains unknown.  –Daily Mail
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This entry was posted in Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Seismic tremors, Unsolved Mystery, Volcanic Eruption, Volcano Watch. Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Ash from eruption of Mt. Etna closes Catania airport in Sicily

  1. Charlotte says:

    How many volcanos are presently (in the last week) erupting and how different is that from the norm? And same question about earthquakes above 4.5.

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  2. J Guffey says:

    Just wanted to thank you again for keeping us posted. Greatly appreciated.

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  3. George says:

    Just to add to the number of active volcanoes, 1500 are the surface observed ones, here is an extract from an article published in New Scientist…….’Thousands of new volcanoes revealed beneath the waves’ Catherine Brahic
    New Scientist
    Mon, 09 Jul 2007 17:33 CDT
    The true extent to which the ocean bed is dotted with volcanoes has been revealed by researchers who have counted 201,055 underwater cones. This is over 10 times more than have been found before.

    The team estimates that in total there could be about 3 million submarine volcanoes, 39,000 of which rise more than 1000 metres over the sea bed.

    “The distribution of underwater volcanoes tells us something about what is happening in the centre of the Earth,” says John Hillier of the University of Cambridge in the UK. That is because they give information about the flows of hot rock in the mantle beneath. “But the problem is that we cannot see through the water to count them,” he says.

    Satellites can detect volcanoes that are more than 1500 m high because the mass of the submerged mountains causes gravity to pull the water in around them. This creates domes on the ocean’s surface that can be several metres high and can be detected from space. ……………………………..

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    • NickKo says:

      Thank you for that information, George. Very interesting.
      It goes to show, that as much as scientists and geologists already know about the earth, we are still learning……

      – Nick

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  4. I love your site bro! Keep up the great work! Well balanced and informative!

    Like

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