Geologists map out Australia’s high-risk seismic hazard regions

November 19, 2012AUSTRALIA - Moe has been ranked as one of Australia’s earthquake danger zones, according to a new national hazard map, released yesterday. The Latrobe Valley town joined locations in the Northern Territory and Western Australia as the regions most at risk after Moe was at the epicenter of two earthquakes in as many months this year. Shockwaves were felt by millions across the state, when a 5.4 magnitude quake – Victoria’s biggest – struck 16km southwest of Moe in June, damaging homes and throwing people from their chairs. A second, 4.3 magnitude earthquake struck just over a month later at the same location, and experts called it an aftershock. Seismologists from Geoscience Australia developed the Earth Hazard Map of Australia by analyzing the location of past earthquakes. York and Kirwan in Western Australia and Tennant Creek in the Northern Territory are also at risk. Resources and Energy Minister Martin Ferguson explained the map estimated the likelihood of a particular area experiencing strong ground-shaking from earthquakes. He said it was this, rather than the magnitude of an earthquake, that endangered people, buildings and infrastructure. The new risk map could be used by emergency services and influence Australian building standards to bolster earthquake-prone areas against damage. “Although these maps do not enable us to predict earthquakes, they will allow engineers and planners to design and locate buildings and infrastructure so as to better protect our communities,” Mr Ferguson said. –Herald Sun
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This entry was posted in Civilizations unraveling, Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Earthquake Omens?, High-risk potential hazard zone, Potential Earthchange hotspot, Seismic tremors, Signs of Magnetic Field weakening, Time - Event Acceleration. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Geologists map out Australia’s high-risk seismic hazard regions

  1. Louise Page says:

    I am glad that Geoscience Australia has come up with this map and the further recognition of potential hazards for Oz. I have been monitoring ground movements for some time now with my amateur apparatus. Many of these movements don’t show up on quake maps, as many of them are too small to possibly be ‘reportable’ to the general public. Also many wouldn’t be felt as you go about daily life.
    I am in the outer eastern (east/south/east) of Melbourne and you can occasionally hear the faint deep ground grumbles as one passes by.
    Interesting stuff ;)

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