Ash from 100-year-old Novarupta volcanic eruption sweeps over Kodiak

November 1, 2012 ALASKA - There was volcanic ash in the air over the Shelikof Straight and parts of Kodiak Island yesterday. A person in Port Lions called KMXT to ask if a volcano had erupted, but the Alaska Volcano Observatory showed all was normal. However, it turned out that a volcano had erupted, though it wasn’t yesterday – it was almost exactly 100 years ago. The National Weather Service office in Anchorage reported that ash from the Novarupta explosion in 1912 was being whipped up by strong northerly winds because of a lack of snow cover in the Valley of 10,000 Smokes and Katmai National Park on the Alaska Peninsula. The ash was lifted to about 4,000 feet and drifted over the Shelikof Straight and Kodiak Island. It was a significant enough amount that the weather service issued a warning to pilots, as volcanic ash can damage airplane engines. Known as the Katmai Eruption, the 1912 explosion came from a volcanic vent later named Novarupta. It was the largest volcanic eruption of the 20th Century and ash fell on Kodiak for three days. –Alaska Public
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This entry was posted in Civilizations unraveling, Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Environmental Threat, High-risk potential hazard zone, Potential Earthchange hotspot, Time - Event Acceleration, Volcanic Ash, Volcano Watch. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Ash from 100-year-old Novarupta volcanic eruption sweeps over Kodiak

  1. World Watcher says:

    I think they are pulling someones leg. If you follow the Cascadia fault line northward, pretty much in line with the recent Canadian 5.0 westcoast earthquake, you’ll see that volcano is directly on the same fault.
    Volcano location
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Kodiakislandmap.png
    Canadian Earthquake location
    http://www.earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca/recent_eq/2012/20121101.0315/index-eng.php
    Cascadia fault line
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cascadia_subduction_zone_USGS.png
    Follow the west coast directly northward, bisects the volcano.
    http://go.hrw.com/atlas/norm_htm/npacific.htm

    The odds of the dust being picked up, precisely when Canada experienced a sizable Earthquake on the same faultline is way to close, I’ll take those odds for a $100. I hate being lied too by those in charge.

  2. Father George Farah says:

    Saint Herman of Alaska,pray for us sinners!

  3. georgie says:

    My mom said the reason this ash dried out enough to be blown about by the winds is because the earth underneath it is warming up from volcanic activity.

  4. Irene C says:

    Wow, not only do we have to worry about the volcanoes that are currently erupting, we have to watch out for volcanoes that erupted 100 years ago. Fascinating.

  5. World Watcher says:

    Volcano location
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Kodiakislandmap.png
    Canadian Earthquake location
    http://www.earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca/recent_eq/2012/20121101.0315/index-eng.php
    Cascadia fault line
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cascadia_subduction_zone_USGS.png
    Follow the west coast directly northward, bisects the volcano.
    http://go.hrw.com/atlas/norm_htm/npacific.htm

    The odds of the dust being picked up, precisely when Canada experienced a sizable Earthquake on the same faultline is way to close.

  6. onthemark55 says:

    Nothing to worry about, just old ash flying around due to lack of normal snow levels and missing glaciers that should be covering it. That’s about as silly as worrying about higher than normal earthquake activity at a newly built dam,that’s showing cracks at it’s base,that holds back so much water that the earth has shifted on it’s axis or a frankenstorm, never seen by man, or droughts in texas, or, ah, hmmm, i’ll get back to ya on this, gotta check fuel level on the generator.

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