Tropical cyclones are occurring more frequently than before

October 18, 2012 CLIMATEAre there more tropical cyclones now than in the past? – or is it just something we believe because we now hear more about them through media coverage and are better able detect them with satellites? New research from the Niels Bohr Institute clearly shows that there is an increasing tendency for cyclones when the climate is warmer, as it has been in recent years. The results are published in the scientific journal PNAS. How can you examine the frequency of tropical cyclones throughout history when they have not been systematically registered? Today cyclones are monitored from satellites and you can follow their progress and direction very accurately. But it is only the last approx. 40 years that we have been able to do this. Previously, they used observations from ships and aircraft, but these were not systematic measurements. In order to get a long-term view of the frequency of cyclones, it is necessary to go further back in time and use a uniform reference. Climate scientist Aslak Grinsted of the Centre for Ice and Climate at the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen therefore wanted to find some instruments that have stood and registered measurements continuously over a long period of time. “Tropical cyclones typically form out in the Atlantic Ocean and move towards the U.S. East Coast and the Gulf of Mexico. I found that there were monitoring stations along the Eastern Seaboard of the United States where they had recorded the daily tide levels all the way back to 1923. I have looked at every time there was a rapid change in sea level and I could see that there was a close correlation between sudden changes in sea level and historical accounts of tropical storms,” explains Aslak Grinsted. Aslak Grinsted now had a tool to create statistics on the frequency of cyclones that make landfall – all the way back to 1923. He could see that there has been an increasing trend in the number of major storm surges since 1923. –Terra Daily
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This entry was posted in Climate unraveling, Cyclone or Hurricane, Deluge from torrential rains, Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Extreme Weather Event, Gale-force winds and gusts, High-risk potential hazard zone, Potential Earthchange hotspot, Seismic tremors, Signs of Magnetic Field weakening, Time - Event Acceleration. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Tropical cyclones are occurring more frequently than before

  1. archie1954 says:

    I always thought that cyclones were Pacific Ocean phenomena and hurricanes Atlantic Ocean ones.

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    • ukjackie says:

      I think cyclones can be in the Indian, Pacific and the Atlantic Oceans.

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    • Johnny says:

      Cyclone is from the Greek word kyklon “moving in a circle, whirling around,” And hurricane is a partially deformed adaptation of the Spanish word “huracan.” But Spanish explorers and conquerors first picked up the word from Taino, an Arawak language from the Caribbean. According to most authorities, the Taino word huracan meant simply “storm,” although some less reliable sources indicate that it also referred to a storm god or an evil spirit. The difference in a hurricane and a cyclone is simply semantics as they both refer to the same weather event.

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  2. Mark.R says:

    A cyclone is any mass of air that spirals around a low pressure center. It is an organized collection of thunderstorms embedded in a swirling mass of air. In general, both typhoons and hurricanes are tropical cyclones but differ in their locations. The difference between hurricane and typhoon is that tropical cyclones in the west Pacific are called Typhoons and those in the Atlantic and east Pacific Ocean are called Hurricanes. It’s the longitude that matters.

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