Scientists probe link between coronal mass ejections and the sun’s interior motion

October 8, 2012SUN - After forty long years of debates and theories and counter-theories, the community of solar physics scientists has still failed to come to a consensus about what causes the sun’s powerful coronal mass ejections (CMEs). CMEs have profound “space weather” effects on land based power grids and satellites in near-Earth geo-space. An international team of scientists explains the mysterious physical mechanisms behind the origin of CMEs in a study published in Nature Physics. The results, based on computer simulations, expose the intricate connections between CMEs and motions in the sun’s interior. This new data could lead to better forecasting of hazardous space weather conditions. Clouds of magnetic fields and plasma – a hot gas composed of charged particles – comprise CMEs. The most powerful and fastest of these events explode from the sun at more than a million miles per hour, with an energy release more powerful than the entire worldwide stockpile of nuclear weapons. “By studying CMEs we learn not only about the drivers of space weather but also about the structure of the atmosphere of the sun and other sun-like stars,” says lead author Ilia Roussev of the Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Disruptions in power grids, satellites that operate GPS or telecommunication systems, pose threats to astronauts in space, cause spectacular auroras, and lead to the rerouting of flights over the polar regions are all effects of geomagnetic storms caused by CMEs. These storms happen when a solar eruption hits Earth’s protective magnetic bubble, or magnetosphere. The study provides an explanation of the origin of these super speed ejections of magnetized plasma and the associated X-ray emissions, demonstrating a fundamental connection between the magnetic processes of the sun’s interior and the formation of CMEs. “Through this type of computer modeling we are able to understand how invisible bundles of magnetic field rise from under the surface of the sun into interplanetary space and propagate towards Earth with potentially damaging results”, says SSC researcher Noé Lugaz of the UNH Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space. He adds, “These fundamental phenomena cannot be observed even with the most advanced instruments on board NASA satellites but they can be revealed by numerical simulations.” Accurate forecasting of solar eruptions and being able to predict their impact on Earth has long been a goal of solar physicists. “The model described here enables us not only to capture the magnetic evolution of the CME, but also to calculate the increased X-ray flux directly, which is a significant advantage over the existing models,” asserts the authors. –Red Orbit
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This entry was posted in Civilizations unraveling, Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Electric power disruption & grid failure, Geomagnetic Storm Alert, Planetary Tremor Event, Prophecies referenced, Signs of Magnetic Field weakening, Solar Event, Space Watch. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Scientists probe link between coronal mass ejections and the sun’s interior motion

  1. tonic says:

    Predicting the suns behaviour, is for sure, a challange.

    http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/SolarCycle/

  2. Granny says:

    Space Weather Message Code: WARK06
    Serial Number: 213
    Issue Time: 2012 Oct 09 0540 UTC
    EXTENDED WARNING: Geomagnetic K-Index of 6 expected
    Extension to Serial Number: 212
    Valid From: 2012 Oct 09 0035 UTC
    Now Valid Until: 2012 Oct 09 1200 UTC
    Warning Condition: Persistence
    Comment: Bz remains at negative 18nT.
    NOAA Space Weather Scale descriptions can be found at
    http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/NOAAscales
    Potential Impacts: Area of impact primarily poleward of 55 degrees Geomagnetic Latitude.
    Induced Currents – Power grid fluctuations can occur. High-latitude power systems may experience voltage alarms.
    Spacecraft – Satellite orientation irregularities may occur; increased drag on low Earth-orbit satellites is possible.
    Radio – HF (high frequency) radio propagation can fade at higher latitudes.
    Aurora – Aurora may be seen as low as New York to Wisconsin to Washington state.
    ————————————————————————–
    :Product: Solar Region Summary
    :Issued: 2012 Oct 09 0030 UTC
    # Prepared jointly by the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, NOAA,
    # Space Weather Prediction Center and the U.S. Air Force.
    #
    Joint USAF/NOAA Solar Region Summary
    SRS Number 283 Issued at 0030Z on 09 Oct 2012
    Report compiled from data received at SWO on 08 Oct
    I. Regions with Sunspots. Locations Valid at 08/2400Z
    Nmbr Location Lo Area Z LL NN Mag Type
    1582 S12W91 085 0210 Hsx 06 01 Alpha
    1585 S19W13 007 0170 Dao 09 09 Beta
    1586 S13E52 302 0080 Hsx 03 01 Alpha
    IA. H-alpha Plages without Spots. Locations Valid at 08/2400Z Oct
    Nmbr Location Lo
    None
    II. Regions Due to Return 09 Oct to 11 Oct
    Nmbr Lat Lo
    1573 N16 238
    —————————————————-
    Radio Events Observed 08 Oct 2012
    A. 245 MHz Bursts
    No 245 MHz Burst Observed.
    B. 245 MHz Noise Storms
    Start End Peak Flux Time of Peak
    2214 2328 110 2232
    ——————————————————————————–

  3. Moco says:

    THese scientists don’t what’s in the interior motion of the earth, let alone the sun.

  4. Why viewers still use to read news papers when in this technological globe the
    whole thing is accessible on web?

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