New ‘Heartland’ virus discovered in sick Missouri farmers

August 31, 2012 MISSOURITwo men in Missouri who became severely ill after sustaining tick bites were found to be infected with a new type of virus, according to a study from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Both men were admitted to hospitals after experiencing high fevers, fatigue, diarrhea and loss of appetite. They were originally thought to be suffering from a bacterial infection, but doubts arose when they didn’t improve after being treated with antibiotics. Further tests revealed their blood contained a new virus, which the researchers dubbed the Heartland virus. It belongs to a group called phleboviruses, which are carried by flies, mosquitoes or ticks, and can cause disease in humans. While the genetic material of Heartland virus appears similar to that of other phleboviruses, the particular proteins it produces are different enough to call it a new species, said study researcher Laura McMullan, a senior scientist at the CDC. Because the Heartland virus causes such general symptoms, it could be “a more common cause of human illness than is currently recognized,” the researchers wrote in the Aug. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. More studies are needed to identify the natural hosts of the virus, learn how many people are infected with it and find risk factors for infection, McMullan said. Because both men experienced tick bites shortly before they became ill — one man, a farmer, reported receiving an average of 20 tick bites a day — the researchers said it’s likely that the Heartland virus is spread by ticks, although more research is needed to confirm this. The new virus’s closest relative is another tick-borne phlebovirus, called SFTS virus, which was identified last year in China, and causes death in 12 percent of cases. The Missouri men, who were both infected in 2009, recovered after 10 to 12 days in the hospital, although one of the men has reported recurrent headaches and fatigue in the two years since his hospitalization. The researchers suspect a species of tick commonly found in Missouri, called Amblyomma americanum, is one of the hosts of the Heartland virus. –Live Science 
Deer deaths in Indiana: Residents of a central Indiana county have reported nearly 100 dead deer in what wildlife officials believe might be a disease outbreak. An Indiana Department of Natural Resources biologist says most of those dead deer have been found in southern Putnam County. Biologist Dean Zimmerman tells the Banner Graphic that 17 counties around the state have had suspected cases of epizootic hemorrhagic disease among deer, although Putnam County seems to have a large outbreak. The illness is a viral disease transmitted by small flies that typically occurs during late summer and early fall. It doesn’t affect humans. Zimmerman says the flies that carry the disease reproduce more successfully in dry weather and that it will take a killing frost to end the outbreak. –NECN
contribution Emanni
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This entry was posted in Civilizations unraveling, Dark Ages, Disease outbreak, Earth Changes, Earth Watch, Environmental Threat, Food chain unraveling, Mass animal deaths, Pest Explosions, Pestilence Watch, Time - Event Acceleration. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to New ‘Heartland’ virus discovered in sick Missouri farmers

  1. J Gold says:

    Sounds very similiar to Lyme Disease, Babesia. Bartonella.

  2. ANIMALAURA says:

    Wonder if there is any coincidence between this new virus and the Plum Island human/animal virus/bacterial research center that was moved from offshore the east coast to near the KSU in Kansas??

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